The Fault In Our Stars – John Green

I am here to apologize for my wrong doings. I am here to beg forgiveness. John Green, I am sorry. I’m sorry for categorizing your book before I read it. I’m sorry I put an etiquette on it before I even knew what it was about. I’m sorry I thought you were just another writer who happened to make it big because he had the right subject at the right time for the right audience. I’m sorry for all of that.

Now, you’ll probably never read this, dear John Green. I am just another reader in an ocean of readers who happened to like your book. But I have to say these things, I just have to say them.

Your book is a majestic piece of writing that deserves every good praise it ever got. Your book is emotion, pure emotion, it’s raw feeling presented on a plate of spikes, which the reader has to willingly gulp down. It’s a flawless piece of writing, which shows through work, love and more than anything, heart. Heart is put into everything in this book – the characters, the story, the descriptions, freakin’ Amsterdam, everything is written about like a lover would write his last letter to his loved one.

It. Is. Beautiful.

Plot:
Hazel, a 16 year old girl, is dying. She has cancer, and her newest treatment just bought her a few years. Because she is ill, she has mastered more maturity than most people earn in their lifetime. She is different, but not by herself. Her illness awoke something in her and made her see everything with a different pair of eyes.

At a Cancer Suport Group, she meets up with Isaac and Augustus. They become her friends, and one of them becomes her boyfriend. And then, as it always happens with kids that are in terminal phase and dying of cancer, one of them passes away.

This perfect book is written in first person narration, which if anyone has ever read about me or seen in one of my reviews, I absolutely hate. I have met with so few books that are like this and well written that I am enemy no. 1 when it comes to “I did” “I said” “I have”. But this.. I don’t think it has taken anything away from the story. Moreso, it added to it. It made it personal. This is not the story of a character, it’s the story of a person, of a human being. It’s the story of Hazel, not of some made up, imaginary friend of John Green’s. This is the feeling you get from bearing with Hazel throughout all that happens in the book.

Now, this does somehow fit into a specific genre. It’s part of the “new” wave of literature, what I saw published after 2000, and it has the same traits and perks that come with fitting into a certain style. But, again, it doesn’t chip away at how powerful the story is. It just makes it more readable. It reaches out to more souls than it would if it had been published in an underground sub-style of serious writers. Really. Mainstream, it is, but easy, it’s not.

It’s serious to the point you can probably make a PhD thesis on its subject. It has twists and turns and a different perspective on anything, and above everything, it’s incredibly funny.

John Green has managed to write something so deep and meaningful and still crack a classic joke here and there, just to show you who’s boss. I wouldn’t have expected, given my experience, to find such a good sense of humor in this kind of book, but it is unbelievably hilarious and it will have you laughing out loud in times when you will feel you should instead be crying your heart out.

Read this, please. Make it a cult. Let it become an obsession.

Green deserves every praise he’s ever got, deserved to have a movie made after his book (can’t wait to watch it now!!).

And I think we barely deserve to have such a good author publish some more books in his life.. that will probably surpass this one by far, given how well I understood he’s evolved.

So, Mr. John Green, I apologize for not believing in you. I am now an addict. I believe.

I do, John.

I do.

….. refference there, maybe? …..

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